Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models
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Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • International trade -- Econometric models,
  • Commerce -- Econometric models,
  • Boundaries -- Economic aspects

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJohn Whalley, Xian Xin.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 12439., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 12439.
ContributionsXin, Xian., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination34 p. :
Number of Pages34
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17630961M
OCLC/WorldCa70962991

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Get this from a library! Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models. [John Whalley; Xian Xin; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- We discuss biases in preferences and their trade effects in terms of impacts on non-neutral trade flows motivated by recent literature on both home bias and the border effect. Downloadable! We discuss biases in preferences and their trade effects in terms of impacts on non-neutral trade flows motivated by recent literature on both home bias and the border effect. These terms take on multiple definitions in the literature and are often used interchangeably even though they differ. The border effect refers to a higher proclivity to trade behind rather than across. Downloadable (with restrictions)! We discuss biases in preferences and their trade effects in terms of impacts on non-neutral trade flows motivated by recent literature on both home bias and the border effect. These terms take on multiple definitions in the literature and are often used interchangeably even though they differ. The border effect refers to a higher proclivity to trade behind. Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models Article in Economic Modelling 26(2) August with 28 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models Sometimes the reduced form of the gravity model used is asserted to reflect an Armington type model. For the border effect to occur as a model outcome, a structural model with at least 2 home regions and 1 country abroad is needed. we offer a characterization of. BibTeX @MISC{Whalley06tothe, author = {John Whalley and Xian Xin and Y Wigle and Edgar Cudmore and Yongfu Chen For Their and John Whalley and Xian Xin}, title = {to the source. Home and Regional Biases and Border Effects in Armington Type Models}, year = {}}. This paper examines the home bias in regional trade and the integration of the internal market in China using inter‐provincial value‐added tax statistics. The administrative border between regions is an important trade barrier that results in home bias. Using a border effect model, we find evidence of home bias in provincial trade and. THE CONCEPT OF BORDER EFFECTS 6 Existing Explanations and Empirical Findings 6! National border studies 8 Sub-national border studies 10 Border Effects in a Unitary Nation 12 Scenario 1. Border effects on cultural phenomena 14 Scenario 2. Border effects on political engagement

Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models Economic Modelling, , 26, (2), View citations (7) See also Working Paper () Introduction to the Symposium on Poverty and Inequality in China CESifo Economic Studies, , 55, (), This article estimates the degree of home bias for U.S. imported food products using an Armington model (Armington, ), and then assesses some of its determinants.   1. Introduction and background. The surprisingly high Canada–U.S. border effect of estimated by McCallum () using a gravity model has been a source of puzzlement ever since the result implied that the Canada–U.S. border still has substantial trade reducing effects even though these two countries share more similarities than almost any other pair of countries in the world. countries in a given pair belong to the same regional group and 0 other-wise. The estimated coefficient will then tell us how much of the trade within each region can be attributed to a special regional effect. Again, the decision to form a free trade area (FTA) is correlated with geographical proximity.